Satirical Fashion Trends

Graphic Design

A series of posters featuring fashion trends in a satirical style. People are so quick to run around in circles chasing after the latest fads, but fashion does NOT always have our best interest in mind (most certainly not high heels)! And some fashion trends are just well… ridiculous. I love fashion, but don’t take it seriously. Sometimes it’s fun just to laugh at the silly trends that come in and go out of style… and then come back in style only to go back out of style just as quickly as they came in. (A spin off of my Real Girl’s Guide to Fashion Trends brochure in the form of a series of posters.)

Satirical Fashion Trends

It’s funny how years ago people would do ANYTHING to avoid having to wear glasses. My dad has terrible eyesight and as a kid often opted to navigate school half blind instead of wearing his glasses. Now people who don’t even need to wear glasses wear them as an accessory. Geek chic. (Not to be confused with hipsters, who, according to Urban Dictionary, are more into philosophy and poetry, while geek chic people are into comics.)

Satirical Fashion Trends

Ugly sweaters were first popular in the mid-1980s. Bill Cosby pioneered this trend, often wearing oversized sweaters with questionable colors and patterns on The Bill Cosby Show. The trend, however, died out as the 1990s began. According to the Ugly Christmas Sweater Party Book: The Definitive Guide to Getting Your Ugly On, the ugly sweater experienced a surge in popularity due to a 2001 party trend from Vancouver, Canada. Now, ugly sweaters are a holiday tradition in pop culture. Late night talk show host Jimmy Fallon has created a segment, “The 12 Days of Christmas Sweaters.” Companies like AOL, Dunkin’ Donuts, and Crunch gyms have jumped on the bandwagon and are even throwing their own ugly sweater-themed parties. How long this trend will last? I don’t know. But what I DO know is how undeniably comfortable a thick oversized sweater is on a chilly winter day… ugly or not. 😉

Satirical Fashion Trends

In 1533, Catherine de Medici, the petite wife of the Duke of Orleans, commissioned a cobbler to design her a pair of heels, both for fashion and height. Mary Tudor, another short monarch, wore high heels for the same reason and from then on, the Pandora’s Box of high heels was opened.

Louis XIV became known for wearing his “Louis heels” which were decorated with miniature battle scenes and often over four inches tall. Heels continued to be associated with aristocratic society. During the French revolution, Napoleon banished high heels in an attempt to demonstrate equality.

High heels re-emerged during the Victorian age but then died away again during the two World Wars and the Great Depression only to emerge yet again in the 1950s. French shoe designer, Roger Vivier, is credited with the design of the first stiletto, utilizing a thin rod of steel for strength. Vivier collaborated with fashion designer Christian Dior to create a series of high heels that oozed with sex appeal, opulence, and status for celebrities such as Ava Gardner, Audrey Hepburn, and Queen Elizabeth II. In the 1960s and ’70s, Charles Jourdan designed extravagant stilettos that were indulged by Imelda Marcos.

Somehow high heels are still a staple in every stylish women’s closet, but it seems like they are merely a torture device for calves, ankles, and the bane of every chiropractor’s existence.

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